Posts Tagged ‘encouragement’

“In his neck remaineth strength, and sorrow is turned to joy before him.”

— JOB 41:22

In the Book of Job, we learn that even at the hand of God, suffering and loss are not experiences earned, nor are they evenly distributed. As we listen to Job’s pleading, his weeping to the Lord, we see that even the virtuous are susceptible to indescribable pain.

But of course, this is not how Job’s story ends. In a resounding message of humility and perseverance, we are told that Job is rewarded twofold for his relentless faith, his refusal to despair.

According to legend, so that his suffering might not be wasted, Job’s many, many tears filled the soil on which he sat. Where they fell to the ground, tall grasses sprouted up towards the sky. And hanging from each blade were tiny white seeds, Job’s tears reincarnated.

The tiny white seeds resemble tears as a reminder that even through the pain there is still hope.

And like Job, there is no waste of tears.

It’s all a matter of taking your tears and turning them into rewards.

 “And thou shall be secure because there is hope.” – JOB 11:18

N.B. The seeds are the oldest beads known and have been dated back to 3,000 BC. In the first century archaeologists found a wire excavated with five Job’s tears strung on it. To this day the seed is used in making jewelry. It is also used in Rosaries. Mother Teresa’s favorite rosary bead was the Job’s tears. Job’s tears seeds have a natural hole through the center for easy stringing.

We have necklaces and bracelets available. https://www.etsy.com/shop/HopeDignity

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main building construction Jan 2020

We have come a long way in one year and we continue to keep moving forward. In 2018 at the Annual TH Women’s Leadership Summit the topic was “What is Your Life’s Blueprint? This was based on a speech by Martin Luther King, Jr. to a junior high in 1967. The most notable quote from this speech was,

“If you can’t fly, run.
If you can’t run, walk.
If you can’t walk, crawl,
but by all means, keep moving forward!”

This topic was important at the time because our first group of hostel students made it through the program and a new group was there with them, together. Our program was moving forward.

These future buildings on our own land seemed so distant. Something we called “Blue Sky.” This is a term used for something strongly wished for, but only seemed to be a dream.

Now today I see this video that came in of the construction of another building at our future girls’ hostel. I thought that when we began last year that it would take at least three years to get near this point. Now today I look in amazement and all I could think of was this quote from Martin Luther King. “KEEP MOVING FORWARD.”

 

main building - jan 21, 2020
Like last year when we heard about Rachel in Kizimba Village who was not in school, we have now heard about 5 girls and 1 boy who are also not going to school. They are living in Kyaka 2 Refugee Camp, Uganda and are Congolese by nationality. This was certainly not our plan because we still have some of our Hoima students who have not been re-sponsored for 2019.
BUT…
Sometimes you have to trust your intuition and be guided by love!
I received a photo of these 6 children from Kyaka 2 Camp last night. The 12 year old is only beginning Primary 3. This is because sometimes they have no opportunity to attend school. When I found out what it would cost to put these children in school I just had to post this.
Esther Mercy age 12 and Gloria Sandra age 10 both in Primary 3 are $20 each per term or $60 annually, Hope Salome age 8 will begin Primary 1 and she is $15 a term or $45 annually, Isaac Kennedy age 6, Blessing Ruth age 5 and Emilly Chimpaye age 4 will be in nursery school. They are each $10 a term or $30 annually.
I have posted a photo of the 6 children.
If you always wanted to help a disadvantaged child, but could not afford the expense, hopefully you will look at these children’s faces and see them.
In this order in the photo: Blessing Ruth, Isaac Kennedy, Gloria Sandra, Hope Salome, Emilly Chimpaye and Esther Mercy. If you are interested, please let me know so children are not double sponsored. Thank you…and bless you for seeing them.
ISAAC IS SPONSORED – THANK YOU GARY AND ANGIE
ESTHER IS SPONSORED – THANK YOU DEBORAH
GLORIA SANDRA IS SPONSORED – THANK YOU LAURA
EMILLY IS SPONSORED – THANK YOU MELISSA
RUTH AND HOPE ARE SPONSORED – THANK YOU BRENDA AND ADAM
Update on the six children from Kyaka 2 Refugee Camp: All six of them were sponsored within 4 hours for their school tuition. Uniforms were all donated through Hilary Steinberger as a gift in honor of Deana Austin’s birthday. Then a person sent a check and asked us to use it for biggest needs. We purchased three boxes of soap for the girls’ hostel, but also were able to pay for school lunches for all six of these children for term 1.

Blessing ruth, Isaac, Gloria, hope, emilly and esther.jpg

These children need to go to school

 

Thank you everybody for your help in putting these children through school, for providing them with uniforms and donating towards their lunches so that the mother didn’t have to bring them food every day. Team work! Thank you everybody who put in a hand to help these beautiful children.

Recently we learned about a young girl named Nancy who went through the trauma of finding her father after he committed suicide when she was 8 years old. She found him hanging from a rope from the family’s grass thatched house. She is attending School in Kyangwali Refugee Camp at Planning for Tomorrow.
Here is her story as I have condensed it.
Nancy Adyek, 11 years old currently lives in Kyangwali Refugee settlement in Uganda.
She was left an orphan in 2016.
Three years ago the father came home very drunk and started off the violence. All the children slept at the neighbor’s. Nancy loved going to school so left for home in the morning to get dressed. Nancy found her father hanging from a rope from the roof of their grass thatched house. She went to the local council one (LC1) and to the police and next was his poor burial.
“Before I was in a school where promotion was more or less automatic, imagine that I was in Primary four but I didn’t speak any English or write. I was admitted in P4T Nursery and Primary School in 2018, demoted to primary Two, I am now in Primary three, speaking good English and writing short sentences. My long-term goal is to be self-reliant. If I manage to become leader and an entrepreneur, I want to live in rural areas innovating and running social entrepreneurship benefiting women and children and I want to fully support girl child education.” Nancy dreams of attending education from Primary to university to become a leader and an entrepreneur.
If anybody wishes to donate towards Nancy’s education, please do and it will be held back for when it is most needed. This is not a sponsorship, but a humanitarian donation.
Needs: Three terms of tuition a year, school uniform, reams of paper, books, pens, school bag, plate and cup, examination, medical fee, development fee, breakfast and lunch, and maize flour and beans.
Nancy Adyek

“There are three kinds of people in the world today,” Disney said. “There are ‘well poisoners,’ who discourage you and stomp on your creativity and tell you what you can’t do. There are ‘lawn mowers’ – people who are well- intentioned but self-absorbed; they tend to their own needs, mow their own lawns and never leave their yards to help another person. Finally, there are ‘life enrichers’ – people who reach out to enrich the lives of others, to lift them up and inspire them. We need to be life enrichers, and we need to surround ourselves with life enrichers.”
A Life Enricher
Walt Disney once wrote that there are three kinds of people:”well-poisoners,” “lawnmowers,” and “life-enhancers.”
He said “well-poisoners” are the negative types who put other people down and try to discourage them from achieving their dreams. They’re people who should be avoided and whose advice should be ignored. “Lawnmowers” are good citizens who keep up their own yards but seldom venture beyond their back fence. They go to work each day, pay their bills and taxes, obey the laws, and maintain their property but seldom volunteer or get involved in their community.
Then there are “life-enhancers”. These are the people who really make life worth living. They go out of their way to enhance the lives of others with encouraging words and deeds.
I share a similar mission in life: to be a person I refer to as a “life-enricher,” an encourager, someone who motivates people to always have hope. All of us have opportunities every day to be life-enrichers. It’s as simple as offering a word of encouragement; volunteering our time, talents and treasure to enrich our schools, churches, government or community; or writing a note of thanks to a teacher, a pastor, a public servant or volunteer.
God calls us to be life-enrichers. “Well-poisoners” try to build themselves up by tearing others down but never achieve relief from their misery. Many “lawnmowers” may achieve material success and even respect in this world. But people who serve others will be first in God’s kingdom.
We all need to spend time mowing our lawns. But take some time from mowing to get out of your own yard and take a few simple steps to be a life-enricher. Thank your child’s teacher, let your children know you’re proud of them, lend your neighbor a hand, volunteer at your church, be a mentor, help with a fund-raiser, put your talents to work for a charity, give blood, invite somebody to dinner, write a note of congratulations to a friend or relative who has achieved something special.
You’ll be amazed at how your word of encouragement or giving a helping hand can have a dramatic impact on enriching another’s life – and your own!